Category Archives: Cordova

Alaska News Roundup for December 16

  • The Taj McHawker is increasingly becoming a political “hot potato” (Rep. Lance Pruitt‘s (R-Anchorage) words) and with reelections just around the corner…it comes as no surprise to many that APRN is reporting that the Anchorage LIO will most likely have a new address really soon. Interested in the legislative hearing on this issue? Head on over to 716 W 4th Avenue for the Saturday 9:00am meeting.
  • The Peninsula Clarion reports that Kenai Mayor Pat Porter is proposing to put the kibosh on commercial cannabis with the town’s limits through a marijuana moratorium that will get a public hearing AND subsequent vote on January 6, 2016 during a Kenai City Council
  • Kake and Petersburg really, REALLY want a linking road to connect the two cities, though the proposed project would cost an estimated $37 million dollars and there is some serious controversy surrounding the issue so…this Magic 8 ball shows :magic 8 ball

 

  • Tundra Drums has the details on the proposed tax increases to help offset the costs of running/operating Alaska’s 247 rural airports. The nutshell would see a $0.10 per gallon in jet fuel and aviation gas taxes if Gov. Bill Walker gives the green light.

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News Roundup for October 2

  • The vibrant Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly candidates for District 1 did not disappoint one of my little birds. Apparently Robin Davis was the most polished of the group by being able to quote previous experiences and numbers on budgetary items. While David Wartinbee’s fish knowledge was “impressive” and Gary Knopp was “on fire”. The candidate that didn’t get positive reviews?   That would be Assemblyman Kelly Wolf for not even showing up. Naughty!
  • The Cordova Times reports that Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s office was awash in 8,000 postcards from United Tribes of Bristol Bay members encouraging her to support their efforts against Pebble Mine or any other similar mine that could affect the Bristol Bay watershed.
  • Guess who can be found in Japan Times? That would be Alaska’s own Rep. Scott Kawasaki (D-Fairbanks)!! The article goes on to explain that while attending a conference as part of a US delegation in Kyoto, he has continued to work toward strengthening the relationships between Alaska and future Japanese LNG buyers.Kawasaki

 

  • For Kenai Peninsula Borough voters, Proposition 4 is a $4.4 million bit of consideration. What’s at stake? The ability for Central Emergency Services to replace outdated or past its usefulness tools like a ladder truck and other vital emergency equipment. The Peninsula Clarion explains both sides of this ballot issue.
  • Tempers and a tempestuous history between Mat-Su Borough Assembly candidates Randall Kowalke and Doyle Holmes made for continued fireworks as the Dispatch furthers the Frontiersman’s original story.

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Alaska News Roundup for July 28

  • One of my little birds is excited about the upcoming Juneau elections because word on the street is that a certain favored son of Juneau (ahem Assemblyman Jesse Kiehl) might be making a run for mayor.
  • The Kodiak City Council were busy little bees at their latest meeting. They not only authorized the regional and county jail contract with the state Department of Corrections, but they also (wait for it…) authorized the purchase of a CAT! 

Correction: One of my little birds regretfully informed me that Kodiak purchased a grader-style cat machine and not the type that meows. L

  • Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz’s New Era is certainly keeping to that ethos in his administration’s transition report that APRN reveals to include novel problem-solving methods. An example: translation and language training in emergency services and morale boost for muni employees.
  • Another one bites the dust! Gail Fenumiai is no longer the director of the Division of Elections, per APRN.

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Alaska News Roundup for July 23

  • Add TTP to your lexicon of dreaded acronyms because the Cordova Times explains why the multinational trade agreement (Trans Pacific Partnership) not only threatens democracy as a whole but could also endanger Alaska’s sovereignty.TPP

 

  • The bureaucratic headache to officially name a currently unnamed Kenai Peninsula lake to Regency Lake (fancy!) is articulated by the Peninsula Clarion.
  • Rep. Mike Hawker (R-Anchorage) told the Juneau Empire that he would consider holding a hearing on Medicaid Expansion in the near future.
  • Gov. Bill Walker’s Medicaid announcement last week got a TON of ink. Now critics are beginning to voice their concerns, including Senior Fellows with the Foundation for Government Accountability in today’s Forbes by making their case this this move would shrink the state’s economy, discourage work, cost more, and it would actually create a new program due to a quirk in Alaska law.Walker

 

  • Saxman hearts the designation of “rural” way more than their current “non-rural” label and APRN explains why.

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Alaska News Roundup for June 24

  • International Agro exporters in the state saw a vital program that provides necessary certification go dark as part of the Division of Agriculture’s budget cuts. The Peninsula Clarion explains the impact not having a phytosanitary certifier will have on this economic sector and regional economies.
  • Usibelli Coal Mine is moving through its mining permit process and the Dispatch details the backstory, location of the mine and its opposition’s reasons to prevent it from opening.
  • Chill baby, it’s a drill! Seward Marine Industrial Center will be without electricity between 8:00-10:00am today as part of scheduled maintenance by the Seward Electric Department.
  • Military exercises will not just be contained in the Gulf of Alaska with 3 Navy destroyers (one that has guided-missiles will be docking at the Port of Anchorage today), a submarine. It turns out that Alaska will have 6,000 soldiers from all four branches of the military conducting exercises across the state, per the Juneau Empire.
  • The Hill’s staffers, interns and high-level government workers are known for being rather, err lackadaisical (some might even go so far as to say wicked lazy) about keeping their online presence technologically secure. Wired has exposed just how widespread AND EASY government workers’ online credentials can be found, thus allowing for easy hacking into government systems. We are talking about passwords, emails, etc. out there on public domains-not even lurking on the dark web. Yikes!

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Alaska News Roundup for June 10

  • APRN has the expanding anger of several costal communities including Kodiak, Cordova and Homer over the Navy’s summer exercises in the Gulf of Alaska. Seattle might have kayakativists, but nothing can match the wrath of Sourdoughs.
  • Anchorage Mayor Dan Sullivan raised tensions to 11 with an ordinance introduction regarding the highly contested land swap proposal between the Ted Stevens Airport and the Anchorage Municipality just by. KTVA has the backstory and the details of the proposal.
Map

Photo Credit of KTVA & the Anchorage Municipality

 

  • Best wishes to the newelyweds- Rep. Don Young and Anne Garland Walton. May your days be filled with joy and peace.

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Alaska News Roundup for May 27

  • Cordova has a friend in the fight to prevent the Navy from exploding bombs, releasing toxic waste, etc., this summer in the Gulf of Alaska with the Kodiak Island Borough Assembly. During their last meeting, the assembly passed a resolution to oppose the scheduled summer exercises.Resolution
  • It’s OfficialEthan Berkowitz is the next Mayor of Anchorage. The Dispatch reports that he received 74% 60.74% of the vote with Amy Demboski receiving 39.26%.
  • The Juneau Empire explains Rep. Mike Chenault (R-Nikiski) and the GOP lead House Majority proposed accountancy jiu-jitsu to gain access to the Permanent Fund. Sen. Dennis Egan (D-Juneau) mentions this move is “volatile”, while my little birds are saying:giphy

 

  • APRN has Chris Tuck (D-Anchorage) and House Minority’s side to oppose the House Majority’s Permanent Fund raid.
  • Indian Country Today did not mince words about Rep. Don Young’s behavior during a Congressional hearing where Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn testified on Native rights. Ouchie.

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Alaska News Roundup for May 21

  • Tensions have escalated between the US Navy and Cordova over the Navy’s intent to use bombs, potentially toxic waste, and high-power sonar during this summer’s exercises because of the potential for detrimental affect on procreating critical marine life. The Cordova Times reports that Sen. Lisa Murkowski will be sending a staffer to facilitate the problem on Memorial Day. As to the worry about exploding bombs, Sen. Murkowski said, “If there are fishermen in one area, they would move to another area.”
  • The Dispatch wonders if raiding the Permanent Fund is the solution to the senate and house majority’s inability to work for a budget solution.
  • Homer scientist, Martin Renner, lead a mapping project to discover where in Alaska oil spills would be the most detrimental to seabirds. The biggest surprises Renner shared with APRN were Unimak Pass and Sand Point.

    seabird-density

    Seabird Density Mapping Tool/Photo Credit of Shady Grove Oliver

  • Sen. Lisa Murkowski introduced a bill for six HEAVY icebreakers for the US Coast Guard.
  • Intercept and CBC News published documents that show the NSA had plans to hijack smart phone apps to further their spying program on US citizens with a project code-name of “IRRITANT HORN.”
  • Gov. Bill Walker’s now-former Director of Boards and Commissions resigned over the intended appointment of Bobbi Quintavell to the Alaska Board of Fisheries. The governor’s administration claims it never happened and that it was their intention all along to appoint Bob Mumford to the vacant seat. The Peninsula Clarion has the gossip and timeline.
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  • Alaska (and 30 other states) won a settlement against the three largest credit reporting agencies in the US over information reporting practices, level of data scrutiny of information provided by outside sources and timeliness on fixing incorrect information, per US News.
  • Matt Buxton with the Fairbanks News Miner offers his explanation of  the accounting dexterity being proposed by the house and senate majorities to raid the Permanent Fund.
  • Sen. Dan Sullivan joined a group of bipartisan senators to denounce China’s construction on islands that are claimed by several other countries. He told The Hill, “as one the world’s key conduits of energy – nearly one-third of global crude oil and over half of global liquefied natural gas (LNG) passes through the South China Sea each year – it is imperative that this region remain peaceful and free of conflict.”
  • The Sitka School Board developed a working plan for FY17 with the hopes that the state legislature regains some “sanity” and figure things out, per KCAW.
  • The Fairbanks North Star Borough is expected to pass a resolution in support of selling FNG to the state, per the Fairbanks News Miner.
  • The NSA has authorized the steps to close down operations of its controversial program of spying on American citizens’ phone calls as The Hill reports that Congress is unlikely to reach a deal to maintain program funding.
  • APRN reports that the White House is planning on vetoing Rep. Don Young’s bill that would alter the Magnuson Stevens Act, which is up for renewal.
  • Obama talked about climate change and the lack of time there is to correct the levels of pollution during a speech to US Coast Guard Academy graduates. Politico relays what the president spoke about and how it was seen by some as hypocritical since this came about a week after he opened the Arctic Coast to offshore drilling.
  • The ACLU has come out against Anchorage’s proposed alcohol sales restriction claiming it is illegal under Alaska state law, Title 47.
  • Slate has an interesting article about Rhodiola rosea, possibly Alaska’s next cash crop.

    Cash Crop

    A different type of Green Rush?

 

  • Erin Merryn, the advocate behind Erin’s Law, is upset with the current language in Alaska’s version of the sexual abuse prevention bill and the Dispatch explains why, what changes have been made and by whom.
  • First Lady Donna Walker told the Juneau Empire her plans to bring Bridge Builders to Juneau.

 

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Alaska News Roundup for May 15

  • My little birds tell me that Mayor-elect Ethan Berkowitz is on the mend from recent shoulder surgery. He is expected to be back in transition-mode next week!
  • State flags are at half mass today throughout Alaska in honor of Peace Officers Memorial Day.
  • It’s not just Joe Miller that Sen. Lisa Murkowski might have to contend with during the Republican senatorial primary, but maybe state Sen. Mike Dunleavy (R-Fairbanks) as well per Roll Call and my little birds. Former Sen. Mark Begich’s 2016 senatorial ambitions have remained elusive.
  • House Finance announced that the committee was blocking the Medicaid Expansion bill yesterday. APRN has Rep. Steve Thompson (R-Fairbanks) statement and Rep. Les Gara (D-Anchorage), HSS Commissioner Valerie Davidson and Gov. Bill Walker’s responses.
  • Cordova is not amused with the Navy’s summer training exercise because of the planned use of bombs, sonar and the expected dumping of 352,000 lbs. of toxic materials during mating season for the area’s marine and migratory animals. KTUU has further details.
  • Sen. Dan Sullivan and Sen. Lisa Murkowski are part of a short list of senators that sponsored a bill to delay the Positive Train Control, the technology system used to monitor trains and would likely have prevented the Amtrak derailment in Pennsylvania, that was supposed to be fully implemented by the end of 2015 after the passage of a 2008 law regarding PTC, per FirstLook.

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